Litigation Support, Realtime Reporting, Software, Technology, Uncategorized

Kick your case into high gear! Hire a Certified Realtime Reporter!!

When the stakes are high and quick turnaround is critical, insist on a Certified Realtime Reporter (CCR) to report the testimony. CRRs can provide interactive realtime by sending the testimony to your electronic device or over the cloud for others on your team to view remotely, and they can produce an uncertified rough draft at the conclusion of the deposition.

Not all court reporters are capable of providing these services, so be sure to request a CRR when you make your scheduling arrangements.  Less than 8% of court reporters hold the CRR designation. Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc., has several CRRs on its staff.

Recommended Software: CaseView is the industry standard for interactive realtime software, and it’s FREE.  There is a CaseViewNet download for Windows and an iCVNet app for your digital devices.  The realtime feed is sent over Wi-Fi or the Internet for remote locations.  No more cables or driver issues.

InteractiveRealtime-WongAssociates

What you should understand about realtime using any smart device:

  1. You should expect a “useable” realtime transcript with limited untranslates. A Certified Realtime Reporter has been tested to write a minimum of 96% accuracy on first pass.
  2. Easily mark text, make annotations, and read along with the testimony.
  3. Don’t be alarmed if you see some stenographic outlines or misspellings. The reporter will make corrections when proofreading.
  4. At the conclusion of the deposition, the reporter will do a quick scan to remove the steno and provide an uncertified rough draft.
  5. Upon completion of the final edit, a certified transcript will be delivered to replace the rough draft.

Helpful hint:  In most instances, this is the first time the reporter will hear the subject matter.  Provide keywords, a caption, and as much information as possible for the reporter to review.  The more information provided ahead of time, the cleaner your realtime feed will be.

Realtime is a powerful tool for litigators.  Put it to work for you!

Litigation Support, Software, Technology, Uncategorized

Want an Edge? GO DIGITAL

The legal profession has been touting the efficiencies of a paperless office.  There are case management software packages, apps, and articles written by the American Bar Association and legal tech gurus promoting all things digital.

Doris O. Wong Associates has been offering digital alternatives for years.  As you build your case, the digital resources available to you from the start are as versatile as they are extensive.

Digital transcript formats include:

  • Standard PDF
  • Compressed PDF transcripts with an interactive concordance
  • ASCII or TXT files
  • WORD files
  • PTX files compatible with TextMap

All of these file formats are printable, searchable, and can be securely stored on any electronic device you use, relieving you of the endless pieces of paper.  They can also be emailed to colleagues within your firm or saved in your private repository for further use.

The most popular digital document is the PDF.  A PDF file can be opened on any device across multiple platforms. The standard PDF from Wong is word searchable (for easy copy and paste) and printable.  For those who want more, the Min-U-Script, or compressed, PDF includes an interactive concordance for easy word searches.

Not to be overlooked is the text found within exhibits.  So you can utilize this information fully, all exhibits are scanned in a searchable PDF format.  Electronic document word searches are faster and more reliable than reading through hard copy documents.

An additional benefit to going digital is linked exhibits.  With one easy click, you can pull up an exhibit for viewing whenever it is mentioned in a transcript. The transcript and linked exhibits are delivered to you in one convenient file.

Whether you’re part of a large firm, mid-sized, or sole practitioner, we have the digital litigation support products that fit your budget and suit your needs.  Our goal at        Doris O. Wong Associates is to provide you with the best tools available that will help you organize, manage, and digest the facts presented in discovery so you can best serve your client and win your case.

Malware, Technology, Uncategorized

Phishing, Smishing and Vishing – Hackers are lurking

If you work online, you can get hacked.  No doubt about it.  If you’re not concerned, you should be.

Dan Bistany of BreezeIT is an IT guru who understands data security and working online and in the cloud.  With major data breaches at Yahoo and Equifax in 2017, with over 145.5 million customers affected, it was time to learn about how we can protect ourselves from ourselves and hackers.

First of all, how many email accounts do you have?  How many of you don’t delete unread emails?  Do you bank online? If so, how many bank accounts do you access?  How many of you shop online and use your credit card?  How many of you store your credit card with services like Netflix and Amazon? These are all opportunities for hackers to get your information.  With each email address, each login, each stored credit card site, you have increased your exposure exponentially.

So what is Phishing? Phishing is a suspicious email purporting to be sent by a reputable company requesting action.  Oftentimes, they’ll attach a link asking you to reveal or verify your personal information, credit card number, password, etc.

There are ways to verify a trusted vs. an untrusted email.

  1. Look at the email address of the sender to see if it’s legit
  2. Generic greeting instead of your name is key
  3. It’s asking to verify an account you might not even have
  4. Grammatical errors
  5. The email asking you to verify your email address
  6. Hover over the hyperlink in the email. Don’t click on it.  The hyperlink is very telling.  A bad link can redirect you to an untrustworthy site.
  7. If you question the email, call the source. Don’t call the number on the email.

Smishing, a/k/a SMS phishing, is conducted over your smart devices via short messaging service (SMS); i.e., texting and emails.  Click on the wrong link or attachment, and you can easily download a Trojan horse, malware, or virus.Smishing

How can you protect yourself?

  1. Don’t buy into urgent offers that need you to act immediately
  2. The IRS, credit card, or financial institution will never contact you via texting or emails.
  3. Check to see who is actually sending you info.
  4. Never store credit card or banking information on your smartphone.

The scary part about smishing is that we all use our devices to conduct business.  It’s unusual for us to have a work phone and a personal phone.  That being said, it’s much easier for hackers to infiltrate you and your company’s information.

Ever get a phone call from the IRS saying you owe $1,000 and if you don’t pay up you’ll be arrested? This is Vishing, scams over the phone.  Never give out any personal information over the phone. If they ask you to verify your email address, make them state your email address first.  Then verify.

Vishing

Being proactive and downloading virus protection and malware software is a great way to start.  However, it may not be enough.  Some things that Dan recommended are:

  • Multi-factor authentication
  • Encrypt your hard drive. Windows 10 has Bitlocker which is free to use and helps protect information if stolen.  Locking your device with a password isn’t enough.  NOTE:  You cannot encrypt your HD and do realtime.
  • Security and awareness training

He also said:  Make a Plan.  If you ever get hacked, your first call should be to your lawyer.  There might be regulatory or security issues with the data breach. Call your IT administrator.  They would understand the forensics of the data breach.  Notify all affected parties of the breach.

Lastly, you might want to get cyber liability insurance.

Ransomware is a growing concern.  It’s a virus that blocks access to your computer and/or threatens to publish your personal data until a ransom is paid.  To pay off the hacker, Bitcoin is the currency to get you out of the jam because it can’t be traced. Hackers are getting very sophisticated.

Lastly, let’s talk about passwords.  How do you remember them?  Are they written on a slip of paper?  Excel spreadsheet?  In your contacts folder?  Again, this is another opportunity for hackers to get your information.  Dan suggested you find a good password manager like Dashlane or  1Password.  Let the App generate and store the passwords for you. Make sure you have a strong password to open the App, and just don’t forget it.  Next, sign up for two-factor authentication.  It’s a two-step verification tool that makes it more difficult for hackers to get into your accounts.  Apple and Google are two vendors of many who have this feature.  It may be a pain for you, but at the same time you’re limiting your exposure.  A little inconvenience can go a long way.

Being connected gives you access to a world of information.  It also gives hackers access to you.  Embrace the good and the bad that this digital age has to offer.  Be proactive and diligent in keeping your personal information safe.

Litigation Support, Software, Technology, Uncategorized

Leveling the Playing Field for the Hearing Impaired

Navigating through the legal process is hard enough, but imagine being a party to a case and being unable to hear well enough to know what’s being said.  If your client is deaf or suffering from significant hearing loss, this puts him — and you as his attorney — at a clear disadvantage. 

Court reporters can help!  Realtime technology is being requested these days not only in deposition settings but in classrooms, meetings, and interviews.  Did you know that closed captioning on TV is provided by a court reporter?


                     Approximately 15% of American adults (37.5 million) aged 18 and over                report some trouble hearing.  ~ NIH


Certified court reporters have the skills necessary to provide realtime for you and your client.  Having the testimony streaming live on an iPad for viewing is a game-changer.  It’s like having a personal interpreter on site.  Your client will no longer have to rely on lip reading or worry about positioning himself close to a speaker.  There will be fewer interruptions and less stress and fatigue for your client.  The court reporter will also provide a clean rough draft at the end of the day.

Give your client immediate digital access to the spoken word.  Let realtime technology in the hands of our gifted professionals take the guesswork out of the conversation, and let your client actively participate in the process with confidence and peace of mind.

Litigation Support, Technology, Uncategorized

The Positive Impact Realtime Can Have on Your Practice

More and more attorneys are relying on the benefits realtime can provide. Realtime is an instantaneous feed from a reporter’s laptop to an attorney’s laptop, iPad, or smart device.  Specialized software allows the attorney to make notes, mark text, and then download the file at the end of the day.  Attorneys can scrutinize the testimony as it is being given, and a draft provided by the court reporter at the end of the day can give them a head start on preparing for future depositions or briefs.


Realtime is our profession’s gold standard


Realtime has other uses you may not have thought of: 

  • Many participants find that visual access to realtime can help participants organize their thoughts
  • Realtime is a helpful tool for those who speak English as a second language. Oftentimes, non-native English speakers can read English better than they can speak it.  This service could ultimately help them understand the spoken word.
  • Those who are hearing impaired appreciate an opportunity to revew a question before answering. 

Preparation is key.

Although you may have been working on a case for many months, or perhaps years, the court reporter does not have the benefit of knowing what the case is about.  This is why reporters ask for word lists beforehand so they can input the subject matter, names, and terminology into their software. This preparation is key to minimizing any interruptions and to your receiving the cleanest realtime feed possible.

Insist on today’s tech-savvy court reporters who provide realtime. 

Litigation Support, Technology, Uncategorized

“What new technology does is create new opportunities to do a job customers want done.” Tim O’Reilly

Doris Wong, while President of the National Court Reporters Association from 1980 to 1981, took a bold move and embraced computer aided-transcription.  That decision dramatically changed the profession.  Where once court reporters manually typed their transcript, the newly developed software translated their steno notes into English.  As technology advanced, new products such as compressed transcripts with word index have become indispensable to our clients, and services like realtime have become our profession’s gold standard.

Going digital means better products and services with more versatility. Digital means interactive realtime and file formats which include ASCII TXT files, compressed transcripts with an interactive word index in PDF, standard PDF files, and PTX.

We research and invest in the latest technologies that make sense to the end user – our clients.  Always pushing the envelope, a few years back we were one of the first firms in the nation to utilize just-released software to provide iCVNet realtime services over the Cloud for a daily copy arbitration that involved over 40 counsel participating from all around the country.  Read More

 

StenotypeMachines

 

Steno machines have gone from a paper feed to electronic cassette, floppy disk, and then serial connections.  Today steno machines are connected to laptops and tablets via USB cables or wirelessly.

 

Litigation Support, Malware, Software, Technology, Uncategorized

Technology for Litigators

Tips, tricks, and information about client-focused litigation support services, technology, and issues you face on a day-to-day basis.

Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc., was the first court reporting firm in Boston to embrace computer-aided transcription back in 1977.