Litigation Support, Realtime Reporting, Software, Technology, Uncategorized

Kick your case into high gear! Hire a Certified Realtime Reporter!!

When the stakes are high and quick turnaround is critical, insist on a Certified Realtime Reporter (CCR) to report the testimony. CRRs can provide interactive realtime by sending the testimony to your electronic device or over the cloud for others on your team to view remotely, and they can produce an uncertified rough draft at the conclusion of the deposition.

Not all court reporters are capable of providing these services, so be sure to request a CRR when you make your scheduling arrangements.  Less than 8% of court reporters hold the CRR designation. Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc., has several CRRs on its staff.

Recommended Software: CaseView is the industry standard for interactive realtime software, and it’s FREE.  There is a CaseViewNet download for Windows and an iCVNet app for your digital devices.  The realtime feed is sent over Wi-Fi or the Internet for remote locations.  No more cables or driver issues.

InteractiveRealtime-WongAssociates

What you should understand about realtime using any smart device:

  1. You should expect a “useable” realtime transcript with limited untranslates. A Certified Realtime Reporter has been tested to write a minimum of 96% accuracy on first pass.
  2. Easily mark text, make annotations, and read along with the testimony.
  3. Don’t be alarmed if you see some stenographic outlines or misspellings. The reporter will make corrections when proofreading.
  4. At the conclusion of the deposition, the reporter will do a quick scan to remove the steno and provide an uncertified rough draft.
  5. Upon completion of the final edit, a certified transcript will be delivered to replace the rough draft.

Helpful hint:  In most instances, this is the first time the reporter will hear the subject matter.  Provide keywords, a caption, and as much information as possible for the reporter to review.  The more information provided ahead of time, the cleaner your realtime feed will be.

Realtime is a powerful tool for litigators.  Put it to work for you!

Technology, Litigation Support, Zoom, Hyperlinked Exhibits, Video Conferencing

TECH TIP 1 – Your Zoom Invitation

Doris O. Wong Associates prefers to Host Zoom sessions.

Zoom Protocol:

  • We are happy to provide training to anyone who is new to Zoom.
    • Go over the invitation
    • Do a video and sound check to make sure you have a good connection
    • How to share and view hyperlinked documents
  • A Zoom invitation is sent out the day prior to the meeting to all participants.
  • Zoom sessions are password protected.
  • The court reporter monitors who is allowed to attend each session.
    • We request that you log in with the email address you have provided us. If we don’t recognize an email address, you will not be allowed into the session.
  • The reporter can set up breakout rooms for off-the-record discussions.
  • Doris O. Wong Associates hyperlinks documents. Only hiring counsel and the court reporter are given the files prior to the deposition.  They are well trained to assist in the document sharing and marking of exhibits.
  • For those individuals who cannot participate with video, a phone number is provided.
Litigation Support, Realtime Reporting, Technology, Zoom

Zoom to the Future

By Connie Psaros, RPR, CMRS

What started out as a simple request for a Zoom public hearing turned out to be a memorable assignment that markedly few reporters around the country would dare take on.  Thank goodness Alex Loos, RDR, got the call. Not only is he a gifted reporter, he also embraces technology at every turn and does not shy away from a challenge.  And he makes it look easy.

Shortly after the hearing was scheduled, a request was made about the possibility of expanding the meeting to include more than the allowed 100 active participants, basically turning the meeting into a webinar platform.  Alex did his research and reported back that various options are available, including a license upgrade that would allow 1,000 active participants and 10,000 passive participants. Armed with the information, it was up to the client to make their informed decision on what platform was best for them.  Ultimately it was a no-go; but had that option been chosen, Alex was ready to upgrade his license and make it work.

Multiple issues were ironed out over several days. Due to security issues regarding holding a public hearing, concerns such as hosting duties, granting passive participants the opportunity to speak, muting/unmuting microphones, sharing documents, holding people in virtual waiting rooms, recording options, how to conduct sidebar conversations, etc. needed to be clarified.  Once the parties agreed upon the public hearing protocols, everyone was poised to start what could be a contentious hearing.

The three-day hearing went forward. As you can imagine, the logistics of this hearing went well beyond the expected reporting duties of writing and marking the virtual exhibits.  Technical assistance by Alex was needed regarding every aspect of the hearing.  Meeting management was his responsibility too. They relied on Alex to handle just about everything, and he not once let them down.

As the hearing progressed, rush delivery was ordered.  When the hearing was concluded, a request was made to have access to the video files as soon as possible for review. The files were quite large since they were all-day hearings and could not be securely delivered using conventional software. The files had to be compressed and a cloud storage solution was found to deliver them to counsel. In the end, the transcripts and video/audio links were all delivered within one week’s time.

Kudos and congratulations to Alex Loos, reporter extraordinaire, who went above, beyond, and then some to get the job done, never faltering, never complaining, never becoming unhinged. Throughout this process he patiently and promptly answered every question no matter the time of day. Everything he did epitomized superior customer service.  In the days of COVID-19, it is worth noting that he took on and completed this assignment without ever leaving his home! He received sincere thanks and accolades from all involved. “Thank you for your stellar work in managing the reporting and technology of the proceedings. I’m sure I speak for everyone when I say we have appreciated your skill, professionalism and good humor.”

We would like to thank the exceptional court reporters out there who understand the importance of making an impeccable record, using technology to do so, and providing personalized customer service no matter the obstacles.  Alex, it is with awe and gratitude that we present you as an example of our profession’s very finest.

Hyperlinked Exhibits, Litigation Support, Software, Technology, Video Conferencing, Zoom

TECH TIP 6 – Chat vs. Share Screen in Zoom

The difference between CHAT and SHARE SCREEN:

CHAT SCREEN

Hyperlinked documents are easily shared in CHAT for all to see.  

Doris O. Wong Associates, Inc., hyperlinks documents upon request.

You can also share files from your computer or file sharing programs like Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive and Box.com.

Anyone can share a link to CHAT.

Participants click on the link to see the document.  CHAT protocol:  Have the witness identify what they’re seeing before you mark the document as an exhibit.

Participants will lose the video when viewing the document.  Audio stays on.  To get back to Zoom, close out of the document or can click on the Zoom Tab to rejoin the meeting.  If you are using an iPad, can click on the Home button and rejoin Zoom.

SCREEN SHARE

One person shares a document for all to see at the same time.

The document takes up the Zoom screen.

            Options:  Instead of full screen, you can keep participants off to the side.

The host can grant permission to all participants if you would like to mark up the document.

Documents can be annotated with text, arrows, lines, etc.

Annotated documents can be saved as an exhibit.

Litigation Support, Software, Technology, Video Conferencing, Zoom

TECH TIP 5 – Handling last-minute-documents in Zoom

Doris O. Wong Associates is available to hyperlink your documents for easy sharing during Zoom sessions.  As prepared as we would like to be, oftentimes there is a last-minute document that needs to be shared.

Option 1:

When you open the CHAT box, you’ll see a little box in the bottom right-hand corner of Chat. It says “File. Click on that.  This box will appear.

If you are using “Your Computer, “ to store files, go to the file folder where your documents are saved.  Click on the document, and it will appear in your Chat Box.  Attendees need to click on the file to be able to view the document.

If you Share a document from Dropbox, MS OneDrive, Google Drive, or Box, click on the file.  It will ask you to Share Screen.  You’ll see the document in Chat.  Click on this file to create a hyperlink which you’ll paste in Chat.  Participants will click on the hyperlink to view the document.

Option 2:

Share the saved document using Share Screen. Click on the document and everyone can see the document full view at the same time. This is different than Chat.

You can annotate the file and later save it as an exhibit.

NOTE:  Forward the documents to the reporter at the conclusion of the deposition so that they may be digitally marked.

Litigation Support, Software, Technology, Video Conferencing, Zoom

TECH TIP 4 – Difficulty hearing online discussions

There can be many causes for not being able to hear participants or they you.  It could be the audio feed or issues with the microphone.

Something worth trying…

If you have a pair of earbuds from your Smartphone with a plug with three rings for the laptop, this is a helpful tool to help with audio. This means it can handle audio and a microphone.  Note that the microphone is also built in to the headset.

Test the earbuds before the session by clicking on the Microphone button at the bottom left-hand corner of the Zoom screen. Select “Test Speaker and Microphone.”

Benefits:  The person using the earbuds can hear better.  The people on the other end can hear you better because of the microphone built into the earbuds.